Contact us
CALL US NOW 1-888-GOLD-160
(1-888-465-3160)
POSTED ON November 7, 2017  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

Ron Paul has identified an increase in what he calls the “most insidious tax” buried in the GOP tax reform bill.

A lot of Americans have put a lot of hope in tax reform. As Peter Schiff said in a recent Fox Business interview, the prospect of economic growth spurred by tax reform and other Trump policies have generated a great deal of optimism. But the question remains: can the GOP Congress deliver? And even if Congress does get a reform package passed, some question whether it will actually lead to the economic growth promised. Absent spending cuts, the tax plan will increase the federal debt even further. Evidence indicates high debt levels retard growth.

In a recent article published on the Mises Wire, Ron Paul identified another problem with the Republican tax plan. It actually increases the most insidious of all taxes – the “inflation tax.”

POSTED ON October 30, 2017  - POSTED IN Guest Commentaries

There’s been a lot of focus on the Federal Reserve lately.

Earlier this month, the central bank launched efforts to shrink its balance sheet after years of quantitative easing. Most analysts also expect one more interest rate increase this year. Then there is rampant speculation about who will take the reins at the Fed when Janet Yellen’s term ends early next year. Many observers think Trump will pick a more hawkish Federal Reserve chair who will increase the pace of “normalization.”

But Peter Schiff has said ultimately the Fed doesn’t want to do anything to upset the status quo.  And at this point, the central bank is between a rock and a hard place. It can normalize, which will ultimately pop the bubble, or it can continue with its easy money policies and wreck the dollar. Peter has said the Fed will ultimately sacrifice the dollar on the altar of the stock market.

In a recent article published on the Mises Wire, economist Ryan McMaken weighs in, arguing along these same lines. He says the Fed won’t do anything that will spook the markets. That means we can expect more “easy money.” But this raises a question – what happens when the next recession rolls along?

POSTED ON October 6, 2017  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

The price of gold has fallen four straight weeks, primarily driven down by anticipation of Federal Reserve monetary tightening. The kickoff of the Fed’s balance sheet normalization program and the expectation of rising interest rates have helped spark a dollar rally. But few people seem to be paying any attention to the pitfalls of quantitative tightening. In fact, the Fed’s policy to push interest rates higher could turn out to be a havoc-wrecking juggernaut.

POSTED ON September 14, 2017  - POSTED IN Guest Commentaries

Peter Schiff has been talking a lot about the weakening dollar. In a recent Schiff Report video, Peter said he sees the “mother of all dollar bear markets” on the horizon. The dollar has already dropped about 12% on the year, and it’s on track for its worst year since 1985. That was the beginning of a decade long bear market for the dollar. Peter says he thinks this one will be worse.

I think this one is going to be the mother of all dollar bear markets, and I think the dollar is going to fall much further than it did in any prior bear market.”

The following article by economist Dr. Daniel Lacalle, published at the Mises Institute FedWatch, provides some further insights into monetary policy by looking at the strength of the euro in relation to the dollar. His analysis sheds light on the relationship between strong and weak currencies, and the cost and benefits of each.

POSTED ON May 30, 2017  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

Americans tend to focus on the Federal Reserve, but often forget the US central bank isn’t the only game in town.

While Yellen and company hint they will try to continue pushing interest rates up, European Central Bank president Mario Draghi told European Parliament’s Economic and Monetary Affairs committee he intends to push ahead with his interventionist monetary policy. That means continued negative interest rates and quantitative easing for the EU.

So, are the world’s two largest central banks taking divergent paths to doom?

Call Now