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POSTED ON February 24, 2020  - POSTED IN Videos

Last year at the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference, Peter Schiff bet Brent Johnson a gold coin that the Fed’s next move would be a rate cut. At this year’s conference, Peter collected his gold coin.

Brent and Peter went on to debate the future of the US dollar. Brent says the dollar will go up this year. Peter thinks it’s going down. Peter put his money where is mouth is and went double or nothing against the dollar.

POSTED ON February 24, 2020  - POSTED IN Peter's Podcast

Investors poured into safe-havens last week as the coronavirus continued to create worry about the global economy. Bond yields hit all-time lows with the yield on the 30-year US Treasury dropping below 2%.  Meanwhile, stocks tumbled Friday, with every major index showing losses. The Dow was down 227 points.

Peter Schiff talked about what’s going on in the markets in his podcast on Friday. He said despite what the mainstream is telling us, the bond market is a great big bubble.

POSTED ON February 21, 2020  - POSTED IN Fun on Friday

The interwebs are a strange place. We can learn about virtually anything with a few keystrokes. We have all kinds of information right at our fingertips.

Unfortunately, a lot of it is utter BS.

For instance, there was a video that went viral that made some people scared of gold.

POSTED ON February 21, 2020  - POSTED IN Friday Gold Wrap

Gold broke out this week. The yellow metal pushed through the $1,600 level and continued to climb. Conventional wisdom tells us this is all about safe-haven buying due to fear that the coronavirus will stunt global economic growth. That is certainly a factor. But could there be more to it than that? On this week’s Friday Gold Wrap podcast, host Mike Maharrey talks about what he thinks is at the root of this gold breakout. He also gets into the subject of inflation. There’s more out there than the standard government numbers tell us.

POSTED ON February 20, 2020  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

The powers that be insist that inflation is low. In fact, the central bankers at the Federal Reserve tell us that low inflation is one of the reasons they can keep interest rates artificially low. But everyday people who go to the store each week smell a rat. We know our dollar doesn’t stretch as far as it used to. If inflation is so low, why do prices seem to keep going up?

The only logical explanation is maybe inflation isn’t as low as the pundits keep telling us.

POSTED ON February 20, 2020  - POSTED IN Videos

Which will outperform in 2020? Gold? Or Equities?

Peter Schiff joined a moderated debate on the subject at the Orlando Money Show. Peter teamed up with Rick Rule to argue for gold, against Louis Navellier and Jeffrey Saut, who contend the stock market is still the place to be. Mark Skousen moderated the debate.

POSTED ON February 19, 2020  - POSTED IN Peter's Podcast

In his most recent podcast, Peter Schiff talked about coronavirus and the impact that it is having on the markets.

Earlier this month, Peter said he thought the virus was just an excuse for stock market woes. At the time he believed the market was poised to fall anyway. But as it turns out, coronavirus has actually helped the US stock market because it has led central banks to pump even more liquidity into the world financial system.

POSTED ON February 19, 2020  - POSTED IN Interviews

Peter Schiff recently appeared on SmallCap Power with Mark Bunting to talk about the stock market bubble. He said it’s the same type of bubble as 2008, only bigger.

The source is the same. It’s artificially low interest rates. It’s quantitative easing. The central bank, the Federal Reserve, is responsible for the rise in the stock market.”

POSTED ON February 18, 2020  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

Subprime auto loan delinquencies have exploded, taking the overall delinquency rate to Financial Crisis levels. But the economy is supposedly great. What is causing this spike in delinquencies?

According to the latest data released by the New York Fed, serious delinquencies (90 days or more past due) surged by 15.5% in the fourth quarter of 2019 to a record high of $66 billion.

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