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Original Analysis

POSTED ON April 16, 2019  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

Yesterday was tax day. We’d like to think the money we hand over to the IRS is paying for stuff – things like roads, education and national defense. But an increasing number of tax dollars are simply going to pay interest on the national debt. According to Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget president Maya MacGuineas, the average taxpayer forked over more than $2,000 this year just to cover their share of the interest on the national debt.

In other words, we’re not paying for stuff today. We’re paying for the spending of the past.

POSTED ON February 22, 2019  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

Everybody wants gold. Some people want it so bad that they’re willing to break the law to get it. That’s why we have police. They stop the bad guys.

At least that’s how it’s supposed to work. But don’t miss what I said. Everybody wants gold. Police officers fall into the category of “everybody.” So, it should come as no surprise that every once in a while, you run into a cop willing to break the law to get his hands on some sparkling yellow metal.

This, in fact, happened recently in India.

POSTED ON February 20, 2019  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

Right after the last Federal Reserve Open Market Committee meeting, Peter Schiff said the “Powell Pause” won’t be enough to save the stock market and head off a recession. He said ultimately, the central bank would have to cut interest rates and launch another round of quantitative easing.

Well, it seems the mainstream is starting to catch up with Peter’s thinking. Yesterday, Bloomberg ran an article asserting that “instead of pausing, the central bank may need to start cutting interest rates to avoid a recession.”

POSTED ON February 15, 2019  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

Politicians promise lots of stuff. Delivering on those promises – that’s a different matter. But when it comes to pledging to do this or that, politicians are masters.

Now, most of the time they keep things pretty vague. After all, you don’t want to commit to anything quantifiable. If you did that, voters could actually hold you accountable. So they promise things like, “I’ll create jobs,” or “I’ll improve our infrastructure.” At the end of the day, you have no idea whether they actually did that or not. (Odds are, they didn’t.)

But one political party in India decided that when it comes to campaign promises, it’s “go big or go home.” So, it’s going big!

POSTED ON January 14, 2019  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

Peter Schiff has said it’s not that we have a “volatile” economy right now. We have a bubble economy, and we are at the beginning of a much bigger crisis than we went through in 2008. Peter continued with this theme on a recent appearance on Kitco News with Daniela Cambone noting that things are setting up for gold to shine in 2019. As far as the yo-yoing stock market?

It’s just the air coming out of the bubble. That’s the volatility,” Peter said.

POSTED ON March 29, 2018  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

Joel BaumanThis article was written by Joel Bauman, SchiffGold Senior Precious Metals Specialist. Any views expressed are his own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Peter Schiff or SchiffGold.  The article focuses on the gold market through the lens of technical analysis. Technical analysis is a subjective form of study based on historical price patterns. The analysis offered is for educational purposes and is not a recommendation to buy or sell.

POSTED ON March 7, 2018  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

Joel BaumanThis article was written by Joel Bauman, SchiffGold Senior Precious Metals Specialist. Any views expressed are his own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Peter Schiff or SchiffGold.

The current debt-based fiat monetary system creates an illusion of wealth expansion.

For example look at this 100-year price chart of the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

POSTED ON November 2, 2017  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

When the Fed launched its aggressive monetary policy in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, many free-market economists predicted it would result in massive price inflation. That never materialized. As a result, Keynesian economists like Paul Krugman love to finger-point and mock those who criticize easy money policies designed to “stimulate aggregate demand.” They claim the lack of price inflation proves they were right all along. You can massively increase the money supply during a downturn to stimulate the economy without sparking inflation. Free-market people are wrong.

But just because we don’t see price inflation doesn’t mean there isn’t any inflation at all. After all, the new money has to go someplace. If we don’t see it manifested in rising prices, it’s because we’re looking in the wrong place.

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