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POSTED ON February 6, 2020  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

Last October, the Federal Reserve relaunched quantitative easing. Of course, Fed Chairman Jerome Powell insists it’s not quantitative easing. But as Peter Schiff pointed out in a recent tweet, that debate is really just semantics.

The argument over whether the current Fed balance sheet expansion constitutes QE is pointless. QE was always just a euphemism for debt monetization. The Fed monetized debt in the past, its monetizing more debt in the present, and it will monetize even more debt in the future!”

POSTED ON January 29, 2020  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

The CBO projects the federal government will run massive budget deficits into the foreseeable future and says the ballooning national debt poses “significant risk” to the economy and financial system.

According to the CBO, the federal budget shortfall will hit $1.02 trillion in FY 2020 and rise into the foreseeable future. Deficits will average $1.3 trillion per year between 2021 and 2030 and top $1.5 trillion by the end of the decade. The CBO projects cumulative deficits over the next decade to total $13.1 trillion.

POSTED ON January 17, 2020  - POSTED IN Friday Gold Wrap

Donald Trump and Chinese Vice Premier Liu inked their signatures on the Phase 1 trade deal this week. But was it really a big deal? Or was it no deal? Mike Maharrey talks about it on this week’s Friday Gold Wrap podcast. He also talks about why the gold market seems to be holding steady despite some strong headwinds and the outlook for the yellow metal in 2020.

POSTED ON January 15, 2020  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

The US federal government ran a budget deficit of over $1 trillion in the 2019 calendar year. It was the first budget deficit over $1 trillion in any calendar year since 2012 — in the midst of the Great Recession.

The budget shortfall from January through December totaled $1.02 trillion, according to the latest report issued by the Treasury Department. That continued a rapidly accelerating upward trajectory. The 2019 budget gap was 17.1% bigger than the 2018 deficit, which was a 28.2% increase over 2017.

POSTED ON January 2, 2020  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

Reuters has dubbed the 2010s the “decade of debt.”

The Reuters report focused on the ballooning levels of corporate debt, but consumer and government indebtedness has skyrocketed over the last 10 years as well. This massive debt bubble poses a significant systemic risk to the financial system and the economy. Some in the mainstream are starting to hint at this, but they still don’t seem to recognize the magnitude of the problem.

POSTED ON December 20, 2019  - POSTED IN Friday Gold Wrap

It was an eventful week as far as news goes, but a rather quiet one in the gold and silver markets. In this episode of the Friday Gold Wrap podcast, host Mike Maharrey covers impeachment and the phase 1 trade deal. He also talks about politicians and their propensity to break things and then woo us with promises to fix them. It’s a little bit like an arsonist coming to the rescue and putting out the fire. Except in the case of government, the fire never really gets put out.

POSTED ON December 17, 2019  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

Fiscal 2019 ended Sept. 30 with the biggest budget deficit in seven years, with the shortfall coming in just a hair under $1 trillion.

And we’re already on track to top that. Just two months into fiscal 2020, the budget deficit is already 12% bigger than it was this time last year and is hurtling toward that $1 trillion mark.

POSTED ON November 27, 2019  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

A paper  by Scott A. Wolla and Kaitlyn Frerking for the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis warns that the Fed’s own policy could lead to “economic ruin.”

The paper titled “Making Sense of National Debt” explains the pros and cons of national borrowing in typical Keynesian fashion. In a nutshell, a little debt is a good thing, but too much debt can become a problem.

But in the process of explaining national debt, Wolla and Frerking stumble into an ugly truth — Federal Reserve money printing can destroy a country’s economy.

POSTED ON November 18, 2019  - POSTED IN Videos

Jerome Powell lectured Congress about the national debt last week, calling it unsustainable. The Federal Reserve chairman is concerned. He admitted that with interest rates already close to zero, the central bank has very little room to cut rates in the event of an economic downturn. Peter Schiff appeared on the Claman Countdown, along with Milken Institute economist Bill Lee to talk about Powell’s comments.

Peter said that while Powell is lecturing Congress, it’s really the Fed’s fault.

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