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POSTED ON December 2, 2019  - POSTED IN Guest Commentaries

On several podcast episodes, Peter Schiff has talked about the warning signs we’re seeing on Wall Street through the struggles of so-called unicorn companies.

Unicorns are privately held companies valued over $1 billion. Companies like Lyft, Chewie, Uber and WeWork were the darlings of WallStreet. Their IPOs were much-anticipated by investors. They are also the poster children for easy-money induced market mania, and their IPOs were crucial for maintaining the bubble.

In particular, the demise of WeWork’s much-anticipated IPO provides a good object lesson revealing the problems of the Federal Reserve’s easy-money policy.

POSTED ON November 29, 2019  - POSTED IN Friday Gold Wrap

Stock markets hit new highs again this week. If you believe the headlines, the bullishness on Wall Street is mostly a function of trade deal optimism. But there’s another factor driving stocks higher – easy money courtesy of Federal Reserve (not) quantitative easing. In this episode of the Friday Gold Wrap, host Mike Maharrey talks about the impact QE4 is having on the markets and some delicious irony courtesy of a paper published by the central bank that admits its own policy might just be a problem.

POSTED ON November 27, 2019  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

A paper  by Scott A. Wolla and Kaitlyn Frerking for the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis warns that the Fed’s own policy could lead to “economic ruin.”

The paper titled “Making Sense of National Debt” explains the pros and cons of national borrowing in typical Keynesian fashion. In a nutshell, a little debt is a good thing, but too much debt can become a problem.

But in the process of explaining national debt, Wolla and Frerking stumble into an ugly truth — Federal Reserve money printing can destroy a country’s economy.

POSTED ON November 22, 2019  - POSTED IN Friday Gold Wrap

It’s been a pretty dreary week on Wall Street with another round of trade war pessimism. Otherwise, there hasn’t been a lot of economic news to roil markets and precious metals have remained pretty much rangebound. But host Mike Maharrey has a silver lining for you on this episode of the Friday Gold Wrap podcast, along with a little Fed analysis.

POSTED ON November 5, 2019  - POSTED IN Guest Commentaries

The stock market keeps hitting new highs and employment reports continue to look good. President Trump and central bankers at the Fed like to point to this and tell us that the economy is doing good. But as Peter Schiff explained in his latest podcast, the markets aren’t making highs because the economy is good. It’s making highs because of the Federal Reserve’s easy-money policies.

Despite the fact that the economic data is deteriorating. Despite the fact that corporate earnings are falling, it is the Fed that is pushing this market to new highs by cutting interest rates, by indicating to the markets that they don’t have to worry about rate hikes no matter what happens with inflation. The Fed’s not going to raise interest rates. Oh, and by the way, they’re doing quantitative easing, and they’re going to print as much money as they have to keep the markets going up and to keep the economy propped up.”

In a recent article published at the Mises Wire, Ryan McMaken adds another layer of analysis. He says that despite the Fed’s positive rhetoric, it’s actually worried about liquidity and growth. In fact, McMaken believes it is operating from a position of fear.

POSTED ON October 30, 2019  - POSTED IN Guest Commentaries

President Trump recently took aim at the Federal Reserve once again, accusing the central bank of “holding back” America’s economy. The president was responding to a FOX Business Varney & Co. segment about negative interest rates in Europe and Japan.

Trump said the Fed should follow the lead of European and Japanese central banks into the world of negative rates.

POSTED ON October 22, 2019  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

Rene Magritte’s 1929 painting “The Treachery of Images,” depicts a tobacco pipe with a caption that reads “Ceci n’est pas une pipe,” (French for “This is not a pipe”). Everyone who has taken a course in modern art knows that Magritte’s exercise in contradiction was meant to draw a distinction between a real thing and a representation of that thing. Perhaps we should send Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell a beret and an easel as he is attempting a similarly surrealistic take on monetary policy.

POSTED ON October 1, 2019  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

The Fed did exactly what markets expected during the September FOMC meeting and lowered interest rates another 25 basis points. It was the second cut of the year and pushed the interest rate down to the range of 1.75 – 2%.

And yet we’re told that this is the economy is “great.”

What gives? Economist Robert Murphy said things might not be so great. In fact, it appears the central bank has basically put the economy on life support.

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