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Original Analysis

POSTED ON April 15, 2021  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

Through the first six months of fiscal 2021, the US government ran a record $1.7 trillion budget deficit. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said this is sustainable – for now.

During a webinar sponsored by the Economic Club of Washington DC, Powell said the economy can handle the current debt load. But he did warn that the long-term trajectory of the US budget is unsustainable.

POSTED ON April 6, 2021  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

Prices are going up. The Federal Reserve is printing money at an unprecedented rate. The US government continues to borrow and spend at a torrid pace. As Peter Schiff put it in a recent podcast, we’re adrift in a sea of inflation. Gold is supposed to be an inflation hedge. So, why isn’t the price of gold climbing right now?

In a nutshell, rising bond yields have created significant headwinds for gold. And the mainstream is reading rising yields and their relationship to gold all wrong.

POSTED ON March 4, 2021  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

Bond yields spiked. The stock market threw a tantrum. Reuters analyst Dhara Ranasinghe called it “a tussle over borrowing costs.”

The Fed won round 1, thanks to a little help from the Aussies. But even the mainstream seems to have noticed that this wrestling match isn’t over and the Fed may be forced to take real action soon. As Ranasinghe put it, “Round Two, and perhaps even Round Three, are inevitable, and they may require policy action rather than just words.”

By policy action, they mean upping quantitative easing – exactly as Peter Schiff has predicted.

POSTED ON February 18, 2021  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

Talk of hiking the minimum wage at the national level has ramped up in recent weeks. With the Democrats controlling the House and the Senate, and Joe Biden in the White House, it seems increasingly likely that we’ll soon see a federal $15 per hour minimum.

In other words, it may soon be illegal to take a job that pays less than $15 an hour.

POSTED ON February 8, 2021  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

The tale of GameStop has much more to say about the current state of investing.”

The central idea in the classic Mel Brooks comedy “The Producers” is that unscrupulous Broadway impresarios could succeed fabulously by creating a play so uniquely awful that it would close on its first day.  Their idea was to oversubscribe shares to investors, to the point where hundreds of percentages of ownership could be claimed. But if the show failed spectacularly, there would be no proceeds to fight over, all the investors would accept that their shares were worthless, and no one would know that they had been conned. The producers could pocket the excess money. The only way they could fail would be by producing a hit.

POSTED ON January 29, 2021  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

If you’re following the markets at all, you know that the price of GameStop stock skyrocketed this week. As the story goes, it was primarily driven up by retail investors on platforms such as Robinhood, and pushed by social media posts, particularly on Reddit. Now, these so-called Reddit-Raiders have set their eyes on silver.

POSTED ON January 26, 2021  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

This year will mark the 50th anniversary of President Richard Nixon severing America – and the world – from its last tie to the gold standard. The rapid devaluing of the dollar is the most obvious result. But another consequence has been an enormous national debt that continues to grow at a staggering pace. Most people don’t realize it, but this is a direct and intentional result of the current fiat money system.

POSTED ON January 21, 2021  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

During testimony before the Senate Finance Committee, Treasury Secretary-nominee Janet Yellen talked out of both sides of her mouth. She acknowledged that too much debt is problematic, but in the same sentence, insisted we need to “act big” to rescue the economy.

POSTED ON January 5, 2021  - POSTED IN Original Analysis

With the coronavirus pandemic serving as a backdrop, 2020 was a record-breaking year in many ways. And some of the economic records that fell were, shall we say, less than ideal. In fact, the impacts of these records will almost certainly ripple through the economy as we move into 2021.

Here are three records that fell last year that didn’t get nearly as much attention as they should have.

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