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POSTED ON April 30, 2019  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

It looks like the Federal Reserve is about to get back into the bond business and help the US government deal with its massive debt.

The Treasury Department announced yesterday that it will not have to borrow as much money in the third quarter of fiscal 2019 as originally anticipated. But this is not because of a slowdown in government spending. According to a Treasury official cited by Reuters, the reason for the lower borrowing estimate is due to an anticipated increase in Fed Treasury holdings as the central bank ends its balance sheet reduction program.

POSTED ON April 4, 2019  - POSTED IN Guest Commentaries

Ever since the beginning of the “Powell Pause,” Peter Schiff has been saying it won’t be enough.

If the Fed doesn’t want to upset the markets, soon it will be forced to go back to QE and zero percent interest rates.”

Peter isn’t alone in saying this. After the most recent FOMC meeting, Ryan McMaken at the Mises Institute echoed Peter’s message.

Put simply: the days of quantitative easing are back, and we’re not even in a recession yet.”

POSTED ON March 7, 2019  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

All of a sudden, the Federal Reserve is considering increasing its balance sheet again.

Remember back in September? QE was on “autopilot.” Then we got the “Powell Pause” and suddenly, the talk was that balance sheet reduction could be winding down. Powell confirmed that was the case just a couple of weeks ago when he told a congressional panel the central bank would be in a position to “to stop runoff later this year.”

POSTED ON December 28, 2018  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

We often criticize the Federal Reserve for its three rounds of quantitative easing. Coupled with artificially low interest rates, Fed QE stimulus — essentially money creation –pumped up all kinds of asset bubbles. Now that the US central bank is trying to tighten, we’re beginning to see the air seep out of those bubbles.

But when it comes to QE, the Federal Reserve has nothing on the European Central Bank. The ECB just announced the end of its QE program this month. The ECB’s QE purchases totaled somewhere in the neighborhood of  2.6 trillion euros. The bank also pushed interest rates below zero. So, what did the EU get for all this stimulus? Not a whole lot.

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