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POSTED ON August 21, 2018  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

Through the last several presidential administrations, the US has maintained a “strong dollar” policy. As Peter Schiff pointed out in his most recent podcast, it wasn’t so much that you could pinpoint the specific tenets of the policy. It was more about the rhetoric that came out of Washington D.C. Everybody talked about the strong dollar being in the national interest.

Having the belief that there was some kind of hidden strong dollar policy helped to create confidence in the dollar. Even periods where the dollar was declining, perhaps it would have declined even more had it not been for the belief that there was some kind of strong dollar policy.”

But times have changed. As Peter put it, “It should be pretty obvious that Donald Trump has a weak dollar policy.”

POSTED ON July 23, 2018  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

The dollar declined sharply, pushing gold up late last week as Pres. Trump criticized the Federal Reserve’s interest rate policy. Trump took aim at the Fed during an interview on CNBC, saying he’s “not thrilled” with the central bank’s push to raise rates.

Because we go up and every time you go up they want to raise rates again. I don’t really — I am not happy about it. But at the same time, I’m letting them do what they feel is best.”

Trump also blasted the European Central Bank and the Bank of China, accusing them of currency manipulation. Trump says the two banks are intentionally weakening their currency to disadvantage the US.

In his latest podcast, Peter Schiff said he thinks the president is saying all of this in order to have a place to put the blame when the economy tanks.

POSTED ON June 14, 2018  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

As expected, the Federal Reserve nudged rates up another .25 basis points on Wednesday. Perhaps more significantly, the Fed took a more hawkish tone than expected, signaling it would likely increase rates two more times this year for a total of four hikes. The central bank had been projecting three 2018 rate increases.

A buildup in inflation pressures was a major reason for the Fed’s more hawkish tone. According to the latest data released by the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) jumped by 2.8% year-over-year in May. The central bankers projected inflation will likely run above their 2% target into the near future. Analysts expect the CPI to hit 2.1% this year and run at that level through 2020.

In his latest podcast, Peter Schiff said higher inflation might be a victory for the Federal Reserve, but it will be a big loss for consumers. In fact, we are heading for a no-growth, high-inflation economy.

POSTED ON March 22, 2018  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

The Federal Reserve followed its script yesterday and raised interest rates another 25 basis points. But the central bankers did surprise some people by hinting at just two more hikes this year. Analysts have been fixated on the possibility of four 2018 rate increases.

The Fed’s slightly more dovish tone on rate hikes sent gold climbing. The yellow metal gained about 1% in the aftermath of the FOMC meeting.

Nevertheless, even while dampening expectations of faster tightening, the Fed continued to talk up the economy. In fact, the central bankers project continuing rate hikes all the way into 2020. In his most recent podcast, Peter said the Fed sounded even more optimistic about the economy than it has in the past. He called it “all politics,” designed to maintain the illusion that everything is great.

POSTED ON March 20, 2018  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

The Federal Reserve opens its March Open Market Committee meeting today. Most analysts say there is a 100% chance for a rate hike during this go-round. Overall, there is a decidedly hawkish attitude when it comes to the Fed. The real debate right now revolves around whether the central bank will hike three or four times in 2018.

But Peter Schiff said in his most recent podcast he isn’t certain about all of these rate hikes.

The fact is I’m still not 100% sure the Fed is going to hike on Wednesday. Now, I would argue or agree that it’s more likely than not that the Fed is going to hike because they’ve been hiking interest rates all along. The Fed, so far, has not given any indication that they’re not going to hike because they don’t want to give up the ghost of this vibrant recovery where they need to raise rates because everything is going so well. But that whole narrative, that whole illusion, seems to be fading very quickly.”

So, could we see a more dovish Fed before the week is out?

POSTED ON March 1, 2018  - POSTED IN Key Gold Headlines

The new Fed chairman has swooped into Washington D.C. like a hawk this week.

In his first testimony before Congress, Powell talked up the economy. He’s also indicated he plans to continue pushing interest rates higher. In fact, many analysts are now talking about four rate hikes in 2018, with the first on tap for this month. Powell said his personal outlook for the economy has strengthened since December, and he sees little risk for a recession.

In his latest podcast, Peter Schiff said Powell couldn’t be more wrong.

POSTED ON February 28, 2018  - POSTED IN Guest Commentaries

Jerome Powell came out pretty hawkish in his public debut yesterday. The new Federal Reserve chairman said he sees little risk of recession and reaffirmed plans to continue tightening the money supply through interest rate increases and quantitative tightening.

My personal outlook for the economy has strengthened since December. I don’t see [the recession risks] as at all high at the moment.”

But there are signals that Powell’s optimism is unwarranted and that the monetary blanket knitted together with nearly a decade of easy money may be about to unravel. In fact, the deceleration in the growth of the money supply orchestrated by the Fed matches the trend just prior to the 2008 crash.

Mises Institute academic vice president, and Pace University professor of economics Joseph Salerno explains in an article originally published on the Mises Wire

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