Contact us
CALL US NOW 1-888-GOLD-160
(1-888-465-3160)

Alabama Joins Pushback Against a Central Bank Digital Currency

  by    0   0

Another state has taken action hoping to hinder the implementation of a central bank digital currency (CBDC) in the United States.

Last week, Alabama Governor Kay Ivey signed a bill into law that pushes back against CBDC in a small way that could place some roadblocks in the path toward implementing a digital dollar.

Sen. Dan Roberts sponsored SB330. The new law prohibits government agencies in Alabama from accepting a CBDC as payment and bars the state from participating in any testing of a CBDC by the Federal Reserve.

The bill defines a CBDC as, “A digital currency, a digital medium of exchange, or a digital monetary unit of account issued by the United States Federal Reserve System or a federal agency which is made directly available to a consumer by such entities.”

The Senate passed SB330 by a 32-0 vote. The House approved the measure by a 103-0 vote. With Gov Ivey’s signature on July 16, the law will go into effect Sept. 1.

IN PRACTICE

In the spirit of James Madison’s blueprint in Federalist #46, the enactment of SB330 creates “impediments” to the implementation of a CBDC in Alabama. Madison said “a refusal to cooperate with officers of the union” along with “the embarrassments created by legislative devices,” would “oppose, in any State, difficulties not to be despised.”

Other states have also taken steps to block the use of CBDCs. Florida and Indiana recently enacted laws that ban the use of a central bank digital currency (CBDC) as money in those states.

How such legislation will play out in practice against a CBDC, should the federal government attempt to implement one, is unknown.

Opponents of the legislation generally take the position that states can’t do anything to stop a CBDC, since – according to their view – under the supremacy clause “any federal law on this point will automatically override state law.”

We’ve heard this song and dance on other issues before.

In the ramp-up to the 1996 vote on Proposition 215 in California, voters were repeatedly told that legalization of marijuana, even for limited medical purposes, was a fruitless effort, since, under the supremacy clause, any such state law would be automatically overridden by the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 (CSA). At best, opponents told Californians, the state would end up in a costly, and losing court effort.

But despite those warnings, Californians voted yes, setting in motion the massive state-level movement we see today, where a growing majority of states have legalized what the federal government prohibits. Ultimately, the federal government will likely have to back down, even if just to save face, because it has become impossible to fully enforce its federal prohibition over this massive state and individual resistance.

A similar situation has played out in response to the REAL ID Act of 2005, already 17 years late on full implementation because a significant number of states have decided not to participate, or in some cases, just provide residents with a choice to opt out. There, federal officials have confirmed that state-level roadblocks to implementation are the primary reason for the continuing delays.

“Roadblock” is likely the way this legislation to oppose a CBDC could play out, and it’s part of James Madison’s four-step blueprint for how states can stop federal programs.

But, as can be seen so far with issues like marijuana and the REAL ID Act, whether a federal program is implemented or not ultimately gets down to the number of roadblocks put up by states, and the willingness of the people to participate — or not.

CENTRAL BANK DIGITAL CURRENCIES (CBDC)

Digital currencies exist as virtual banknotes or coins held in a digital wallet on your computer or smartphone. The difference between a central bank (government) digital currency and peer-to-peer electronic cash such as bitcoin is that the value of the digital currency is backed and controlled by the government, just like traditional fiat currency.

Government-issued central bank digital currencies are sold on the promise of providing a safe, convenient, and more secure alternative to physical cash. We’re also told it will help stop dangerous criminals who like the intractability of cash. But there is a darker side – the promise of control.

At the root of the move toward government digital currency is “the war on cash.” The elimination of cash creates the potential for the government to track and even control consumer spending.

Imagine if there was no cash. It would be impossible to hide even the smallest transaction from the government’s eyes. Something as simple as your morning trip to Starbucks wouldn’t be a secret from government officials. As Bloomberg put it in an article published when China launched a digital yuan pilot program in 2020, digital currency “offers China’s authorities a degree of control never possible with physical money.”

The government could even “turn off” an individual’s ability to make purchases. Bloomberg described just how much control a digital currency could give Chinese officials.

The PBOC has also indicated that it could put limits on the sizes of some transactions, or even require an appointment to make large ones. Some observers wonder whether payments could be linked to the emerging social-credit system, wherein citizens with exemplary behavior are ‘whitelisted’ for privileges, while those with criminal and other infractions find themselves left out. ‘China’s goal is not to make payments more convenient but to replace cash, so it can keep closer tabs on people than it already does,’ argues Aaron Brown, a crypto investor who writes for Bloomberg Opinion.”

Economist Thorsten Polleit outlined the potential for Big Brother-like government control with the advent of a digital euro in an article published by the Mises Wire. As he put it, “the path to becoming a surveillance state regime will accelerate considerably” if and when a digital currency is issued.

Several countries are already experimenting with CBDC, including Nigeria and China.

In 2022, the Federal Reserve released a “discussion paper” examining the pros and cons of a potential US central bank digital dollar. According to the central bank’s website, there has been no decision on implementing a digital currency, but this pilot program reveals the idea is further along than most people realized.

The Tenth Amendment Center contributed to this report. 

Get Peter Schiff’s key gold headlines in your inbox every week – click here – for a free subscription to his exclusive weekly email updates.
Interested in learning how to buy gold and buy silver?
Call 1-888-GOLD-160 and speak with a Precious Metals Specialist today!

Related Posts

Which Central Banks Are Selling Gold?

Central bank gold buying has been a significant factor in the yellow metal’s spectacular run-up to new record highs. But with its recent small correction downward, it’s a good time to look at which central banks are selling — and why.

READ MORE →

Death of Iranian President Carries Gold, Copper to New Record Highs

Amid ongoing tension in the Middle East, Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi and the foreign minister have been confirmed dead Monday after a helicopter crash. The officials’ shocking demise casts additional investor doubt on a region already plagued by economic upheaval, with supply chain uncertainties fueling record-high metal prices this week.

READ MORE →

South Korea’s New Way to Pursue Safety

While gold bullion is most often sold in bar or 1oz coin form, the Korean retail market is benefitting from gold’s latest success with a very atypical marketing strategy. It has been traditionally thought that investors prefer larger increments of bullion because they simplify calculations and have a lower transaction cost than buying the same amount of gold in smaller increments. Demand for traditional bars and coins in South […]

READ MORE →

What Will CBDCs Mean for Gold?

With the eventual introduction of central bank digital currency (CBDCs) now seemingly inevitable, there are a lot of directions central banks could take with their digital currency projects that would have dramatic implications for the price of gold.

READ MORE →

Will the World’s Most Pro-Bitcoin Politician Embrace Gold?

Since Nayib Bukele became president of El Salvador, El Salvador has been in American media and global political discussion more than ever. While much of the attention focuses on Bukele’s mass incarceration of gang members and a decline in homicide of over 70%, Bukele has also drawn attention to his favoritism towards Bitcoin and how he […]

READ MORE →

About The Author

Michael Maharrey is the managing editor of the SchiffGold blog, and the host of the Friday Gold Wrap Podcast and It's Your Dime interview series.
View all posts by

Comments are closed.

Call Now